CHALLENGES IN LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION TEACHING IN THE WEB..

The GREALT research group (Research Group in Teaching and Learning of Languages and Translation) is pleased to present this volume, Challenges in Languages and Translation Teaching in the Web 2.0 Era, bringing together interdisciplinary pedagogical proposals that promote student autonomy in the fields of translator training, applied linguistics and translation technologies. Each of these proposals presents a cross-disciplinary view of education, as can be seen in the variety of approaches and the special emphasis on procedures and tools that enhance student autonomy. Some proposals also aim to meet vocational needs in the fields of translation and applied linguistics. This volume follows in the footsteps of Acortar distancias (Cánovas, González Davies & Keim, 2009) and includes various proposals for using Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in translation and foreign language classrooms for knowledge construction and student-centred learning.
In the 2.0 era the fields of translation and applied linguistics have been characterised by blended learning, using ICT to foster communication and interaction and share knowledge in order to acquire competencies such as teamwork, the ability to adapt to varying work environments, the ability to set and pursue goals and to demonstrate achievement. Furthermore, interdisciplinary research carried out by educators in the fields of translation and applied linguistics has led to promising studies on the way that contact between languages can promote efficient learning. The studies compiled in the present volume contribute to our knowledge of these fields.
Most of the authors of these articles teach university courses in translation and second languages for specific purposes in the fields of education, business, and translation and interpreting. The goal of these studies is to showcase best practice based on research and to offer proposals for re-aligning programmes and curricula in the light of experience acquired over many years teaching at university level within student-centred frameworks. Without detracting from individual merits, the articles have been grouped into four overarching categories: Syllabus design and assessment: learner autonomy and collaborative learning; Cross-curricular and integrated skills; Online and blended learning; Digital tools in translator training.
The first and longest section, Syllabus design and assessment: learner autonomy and collaborative learning, presents studies and methodological proposals by Teras & Leikomaa, Mallol, Khan, and Delgar, focusing on designing teaching sequences and projects to promote autonomy and collaborative learning. This section also gives details of tools for self-assessment, which may foster greater self-awareness of the learning process among students, particularly in the field of oral production, as reflected in the article by Pinyana. Finally, Yarosh & Muies describe a test given to translation students that aims to measure intercul¬tural competence using both introspection and task-based problem-solving.
The second section, Cross-curricular and integrated skills, presents studies in which contact between languages and different disciplines in the classroom fosters learning in one way or another. González Davies explores how translation may be used as a tool, both as a spontaneous or a taught learning strategy, to promote the development of linguistic skills and intercultural competence in the foreign language classroom. Fernández presents teaching sequences for German as a foreign language in translation and interpreting programmes, explicitly engaging students in both translating and contrastive exercises. Binghadeer uses interpreting in language classes to enhance oral production skills. Finally, Espasa and Bartrina examine how participatory assessment can draw on student creativity in translating advertising materials with gender in mind.
The third section, Online and blended learning, contains three proposals for designing programmes and Master’s Degree classes in these conditions. Each case examines how students interact with the help of digital tools such as forums and videoconferencing. Bordons and Gimeno describe the design of a Master’s Degree in Teacher Training for Teachers of Catalan to Adults. Torres discusses the curricular design of a course on Career Opportunities in the field of specialised translation, while Cánovas and Samson focus on a course in Computing and Translation.
Finally, the fourth section, Digital tools in translator training, brings together articles analysing the use of digital tools in the teaching of translation at university level. Some authors argue for the redistribution of computing and translation competencies among the subjects taught in degrees in Translation and Interpreting. Galán focuses on Web 2.0 tools in teaching translation. Piqué and Sánchez Gijón survey the tasks professional translators carry out and redefine technical competency in Translation and Interpreting studies. Lastly, Diaz Fouces overviews how professional translators use computer-assisted translation tools and recommends that universities utilise open source software programs.

PREFACE
Lucrecia Keim

I
SYLLABUS DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT:
LEARNER AUTONOMY AND COLLABORATIVE LEARNING

«DO I NEED TO STUDY IN MY FREE TIME?»: AUTHENTIC LEARNING IN A PROFESSIONAL ENGLISH COURSE
Hanna Teräs and Marianna Leikomaa

APRENENTATGE COOPERATIU A TRAVÉS DE PROJECTES DIGITALS A L’AULA DE LLENGÜES ESTRANGERES
Cristina Mallol Macau

USING A WIKI IN LEARNER-CENTRED L2 VOCABULARY LEARNING
Sarah Khan

ESCRIURE EN COL•LABORACIÓ EN EL MARC DE L’ASSIGNATURA DE FRANCÈS COM A LLENGUA C
Gemma Delgar

CREACIÓ D’UNA EINA D’AUTOAVALUACIÓ DE LA PRODUCCIÓ ORAL EN ANGLÈS BASADA EN EL MARC COMÚ DE REFERÈNCIA EUROPEU
Àngels Pinyana

MEASURING TRANSLATOR INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE: POSSIBLE PERFORMANCE TEST TASKS
Maria Yarosh and Larry Muies


II
CROSS-CURRICULAR AND INTEGRATED SKILLS

TRANSLATING FOR OTHER LEARNING CONTEXTS: THE L1 AND TRANSLATION IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNING FOR TEACHER TRAINEES
Maria González Davies

LA ENSEÑANZA DEL ALEMÁN PARA ESTUDIANTES DE TRADUCCIÓN MEDIANTE SECUENCIAS DE TAREAS CON UN ENFOQUE CONTRASTIVO
Francesc Fernández

INTERPRETATION AS A TOOL IN SPEAKING CLASSES
Nora A. Binghadeer

EVALUATING CREATIVITY FROM A PERSPECTIVE OF FEMINIST PEDAGOGIES: TRANSLATING PRINT ADVERTISEMENTS IN THE VIRTUAL CLASSROOM
Francesca Bartrina and Eva Espasa


III
ONLINE AND BLENDED LEARNING

SEMIPRESENCIALITAT I EINES DIGITALS EN UN CURS PER FORMAR PROFESSORAT AUTÒNOM I COL•LABORATIU
Glòria Bordons i Montserrat Gimeno

LA FORMACIÓN DE LOS ESTUDIANTES EN INSERCIÓN LABORAL EN CURSOS A DISTANCIA
Olga Torres Hostench

AN ONLINE COURSE IN COMPUTER SKILLS FOR TRANSLATORS
Marcos Cánovas and Richard Samson


IV
DIGITAL TOOLS IN TRANSLATOR TRAINING

TRADUCCIÓN 2.0. LAS HERRAMIENTAS SOCIALES EN LA FORMACIÓN DE TRADUCTORES
Anabel Galán-Mañas

LA COMPETÈNCIA INSTRUMENTAL EN TRADUCCIÓ: MAPA CONCEPTUAL DE TASQUES
Ramon Piqué Huerta i Pilar Sánchez-Gijón

LA NATURALEZA DE LAS HABILIDADES TECNOLÓGICAS EN LA FORMACIÓN DE TRADUCTORES Y EL PAPEL DEL SOFTWARE LIBRE
Oscar Diaz Fouces

Colección
OBRAS GENERALES
Materia
NO¦JURIDICO, INGLES, OBRAS GENERALES
Idioma
  • Castellano
EAN
9788498369526
ISBN
978-84-9836-952-6
Depósito legal
GR. 1665/2012
Páginas
176
Ancho
17 cm
Alto
24 cm
Edición
1
Fecha publicación
08-06-2012
Rústica sin solapas
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